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Birthdays!

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Maurice R

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Race Radar

SUNDAY, FEB 10th,    CEDAR 12K ROAD RACE

SUNDAY, FEB 24th,    HATLEY CASTLE 8K

SATURDAY, MAR 9th   UBC TRIATHON

SUNDAY, MAR 10th  PORT ALBERNI 15K

SUNDAY, MAR 24th  COMOX HALF MARATHON

SUNDAY APR 7th      SOOKE 10K

SUNDAY APR 14th    BAZAN  BAY 5K


Clinics and Camps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riding in a Paceline is a Basic Cycling Skill

Many group rides can turn into survival of the fittest, where the novice is quickly sent off the back. Ideally a group should contain both novices and experienced riders who don�t feel compelled to prove themselves on every ride. The key is riding safely and effectively in a paceline.

Pacelines are either single or double. In a single paceline, everyone lines up behind the first rider who maintains a constant speed. The rotation occurs when the front rider pulls off to the side and drifts to the back of the line. The next rider then sets the pace. Riders stay on the front from a few seconds to several minutes. This type of paceline has the advantage of requiring less road space. A double paceline contains two lines of riders side by side, continuously in motion. One line goes slightly faster than the other does. The lead rider in the faster line crosses over to the lead of the slower line when they pass the front wheel of the lead rider of that line.You then drift back with the other riders of the slower line. When the back of the line is reached slide onto the back wheel of the last rider in the fast line.

SINGLE PACELINE Try a single paceline first. Lead for 20 to 30 seconds, then pull off either to the right or left and slide to the back of the line. Stay close enough to bump elbows, then move in behind the last person.

DOUBLE PACELINE Try the double paceline. Form two lines, side by side. Move up the faster line, pull over, then drop back back in the slower line. Can be done both clockwise and counter clockwise.

-Tips for a more efficient paceline-

Get used to following closely to the rider in front of you to get the benefit of the draft. You use much less energy following a cyclist than riding out in the wind by yourself.

Maintain a constant speed when you get to the front by glancing at your cycle computer. The tendency for new riders is to jump and pick up the pace.

If the rider at the front charges off, let that person go and hold your speed.

If you tire, sit out as many turns as necessary at the back of the line. Let riders coming back know that you are resting, and give them space to move in ahead of you.

When in front of the line don�t use too much energy as you will still need to be able to accelerate and get on the back of the line.

As the speed increases, gaps may develop because riders can�t hold the wheel ahead or miss the last wheel as they try and get back on the end of the paceline. strong riders need to fill these gaps in order to preserve the flow, even if it means jumping across and moving back up the line early.

DO YOUR FAIR SHARE OF THE WORK AT THE FRONT WHILE SAVING YOUR ENERGY FOR THE END OF THE RIDE